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Ancient World Series → Rise of the Roman Republic

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Rise of the Roman Republic


PUBLISHED 2003
DESIGNER Richard Berg
DEVELOPER Alan Ray
ART DIRECTOR/PACKAGE DESIGN Rodger B. MacGowan
MAP ART Mark Simonitch
COUNTER ART Rodger B. MacGowan and Mark Simonitch
PRODUCERS Gene Billingsley, Tony Curtis, Andy Lewis, Rodger B. MacGowan, Mark Simonitch


Price: $60.00 
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Product Rating: (3.88)   # of Ratings: 16   (Only registered customers can rate)

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Showing comments 1-8 of 8
1. John on 4/12/2009, said:

An excellent beginning for a great series. RRR takes some investment, it is detailed-but not overly complex. After your first practice game it flows very well and lives up to the praise provided by others here. Rules have been updated and clarified rendering old criticisms obsolete. Interesting, absorbing, fun. A rare achievement.
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2. Gregory on 11/16/2008, said:

Awesome game covering the Roman Republic.
Was this comment helpful? yes no   (3 people found this comment helpful, 1 did not)
3. Fabrizio on 11/8/2008, said:

i love it. one of the best strategic games never published, maybe just a little cumbersome on rules... great for solitaire play.
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4. Robert on 6/29/2008, said:

This game is fantastic. Yes, it takes some time to understand, but it is well worth the effort. The random LAM draw makes it a great solitaire game as well. I look forward to future editions of this series!
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5. Jimmie on 6/13/2008, said:

I love this game and it's companion Carthage. It really gives a feel for the politics of ancient Rome and the effect such politics had on warfare. The rules are complex, but rewarding for those willing to learn them. Indeed, even the Roman political rules are easy to effectuate in play once one grasps the concepts. I can't wait for the next game in the series.
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6. Charles on 5/9/2008, said:

too much effort to decode the election system
Was this comment helpful? yes no   (2 people found this comment helpful, 7 did not)
7. Victor Lozano on 11/3/2007, said:

the rules very badly are written and are incomplete
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8. Bruno on 9/28/2007, said:

Maybe not a really bad game, but suffers from too complex rules. Especially the rules concerning where/when/why/what the Roman leaders can command are a major turn-off.
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Showing comments 1-8 of 8

The Ancient World: Rise of the Roman Republic is the first volume in a projected series of games that will cover virtually every war and campaign in ancient history on the same scale and scope that the legendary Europa series did for WWII. Each game and module in the series will add maps, units, and all the personalities that will enable you to play, in some, but not daunting, detail your favorite periods.

Volume I, Rise of the Roman Republic, is the introductory game to the Ancient World series with shorter, smaller scenarios. Rise of the Roman Republic includes scenarios for the Samnite Wars (which also includes a three-player version that takes in the invasion of Alexander of Epirus), the invasion of Pyrrhus (including his Sicilian adventures), and also the first three years of Hannibal, all on a single map of Italy, complete with dated road system.

The focal point of the game system is the unusual set of mechanics that, in essence, have no allowance limits to movement. Units - troops under a leader - are free to move as far and as long as they want, subject to two major factors: leader capability to do so, as well as attrition.

The Romans are really fun, mostly because you have to master the Roman political system, from yearly elections, to pro-roguing consuls, even to asking the Senate permission to do many things, all of which serve to make running the Roman armies about as close to realistic as has ever been seen in a wargame.

The land combat system uses a unique Combat Results Table that includes the dreaded Unusual Result dicerolls, which replicate the battles that took place wherein the outcome belied the odds. But you still get the Carthaginian cavalry, the Epirote hoplites, elephants, and all the usual goodies you'd expect in such a game.

The Ancient World is aimed at aficionados of the subject, as well as those interested in the breadth and depth of campaign operations. Yet it is a very playable system in which most scenarios can be finished in an evening, and none, in Rise of the Roman Republic, take more than one map.

 


Game Features

TIME SCALE 1 year per turn
MAP SCALE 13 miles per hex
UNIT SCALE

Strength point = either 500 men; 300 cavalry; 10 elephants

NUMBER OF PLAYERS 1-2