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Card-Driven Games → WW2: Barbarossa to Berlin, 2006 Edition

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WW2: Barbarossa to Berlin, 2006 Edition


COMPONENTS

  • 368 full-color die-cut counters
  • One 22"x34" full-color mapsheet
  • 110 Strategy cards
  • 16-page Rulebook
  • 2 Player Aid cards
  • Two 6-sided dice

    ONLINE RESOURCES

  • VASSAL Module - courtesy of Joel Toppen
  • 2006 Version Living Rules
  • Cyberboard GameBox v. 3.2
  • Cyberboard Gamebox v. 4.0 - courtesy of Robert Lecuyer
  • Here is an updated (September, 2009) "Axis High Tide" Tournament Scenario from Designer Ted Raicer.

  • PUBLISHED: 2002, 2006
    DESIGNER: Ted Raicer
    DEVELOPER: William F Ramsay, Jr & Steve Kosakowski
    ART DIRECTOR/PACKAGING: Rodger B. MacGowan
    MAP & COUNTER ART: Mark Simonitch
    CARD ART: Mark Simonitch & Rodger B. MacGowan
    PRODUCERS: Gene Billingsley, Tony Curtis, Andy Lewis, Rodger MacGowan, Mark Simonitch


    Price: $55.00 
    Quantity:  

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    Product Rating: (4.26)   # of Ratings: 35   (Only registered customers can rate)

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    Showing comments 1-10 of 13 (Next 10) Click Here to see all comments
    1. Jan on 11/26/2012, said:

    This game is definitely a 5, following closely behind its older brother, Paths of Glory, which is in my opinion and those of the gaming group that I play in, the best all time two-player game. Here I Stand is the best all time multi-player game, although we haven't "graduated" to Virgin Queen yet! Also, I would have to respectfully disagree with Dirk's comments below. Mechanized forces have four distinct advantages in this game over infantry forces: first they move faster as would be expected; second, they can attack from up to two adjacent flanking squares in a three square attack; third, they can move into a square designated for combat and then also attack; and fourth they can exploit any combat victories by advancing after combat more than victorious infantry units and are not restricted to the retreat path of defeated defenders. I believe that these significant advantages accurately reflect the "simulation" differences for mechanized units at this strategic level of warfare where turns represent entire seasons. Also, I'm sure that some might feel that the combat system reflects too few casualties! For example, I would expect that a US player with two full strength armies going against a full strength Panzer army will be very disappointed with a 5/6 chance of causing only a single step loss, and only a 1/6 chance of a two step loss, still leaving a surviving corps, and then experiencing a step loss in return. Same story for two full strength Panzer armies going against a full strength Soviet mechanized fronts. Of course the 1/6 chance of the "snake eye" on the return fire would be most welcome! I like the effects of these outcomes, and think that these effects model strategic level combat extremely well. In any event, this game is a 5, and I highly recommended it to those interested in World War II at the strategic level.
    Was this comment helpful? yes no   (4 people found this comment helpful, 0 did not)
    2. Scott on 10/8/2012, said:

    A quick playing game on the Second World War in the West. One of the few games that nicely models what Patton was able to do with his Army. Some of the card scripting may seem a bit wonky, but the Second Edition really smoothes this out. Another great game from Ted Raicer!
    Was this comment helpful? yes no   (4 people found this comment helpful, 1 did not)
    3. Gary on 7/1/2012, said:

    Just picked up 1st Edition and very pleasantly surprised at how enjoyable it is with decent historicity
    Was this comment helpful? yes no   (1 people found this comment helpful, 0 did not)
    4. Paul on 3/31/2012, said:

    vassal module has a small bug. 2 German Reinforcement Armor corp are missing from counter box
    Was this comment helpful? yes no   (3 people found this comment helpful, 0 did not)
    5. Michael on 11/19/2011, said:

    A game that has gotten a bum rap, in part because it followed on the heels of the "phenom" Paths of Glory. But as a conflict simulation B2B actually does a better modeling job than PoG does. There are less options but the feel is more historical.
    Was this comment helpful? yes no   (4 people found this comment helpful, 0 did not)
    6. Dirk on 10/3/2010, said:

    Sorry guys, this may be a good game, but it is not about WW II. The combat system is simply not appropriate. Combat odds don't play a role at all. Attacker losses are always high. Mechanised units don't have any influence on the outcome of combat. So, where the system is very good for WW I it fails utterly for WW II. As I said, it may be a good game, but it is a bad simulation.
    Was this comment helpful? yes no   (2 people found this comment helpful, 4 did not)
    7. Matvey on 1/17/2010, said:

    Very good game!
    Was this comment helpful? yes no   (1 people found this comment helpful, 0 did not)
    8. Silvio on 5/6/2009, said:

    Hello, I know this is not perhaps the best place where I could place my question, but I don't know an otheR: i'm learning the rules of this game and an example of play (1 or 2 turns) would be very helpfull: does someone know if and where is it available? Thanks
    Was this comment helpful? yes no   (1 people found this comment helpful, 0 did not)
    9. Steve on 5/4/2009, said:

    I liked the game. It makes a nice WWII Europe game which is not too complex and plays fairly fast.
    Was this comment helpful? yes no   (1 people found this comment helpful, 0 did not)
    10. Olivier on 10/21/2007, said:

    It's a good game but we do need a scenario per year as for Paths of of glory. Just one 1941 scenario is insufficient Please give us a scenario for each 1942,1943,1944. Olivier Paris
    Was this comment helpful? yes no   (4 people found this comment helpful, 2 did not)
    Showing comments 1-10 of 13 (Next 10) Click Here to see all comments

    World War 2: Barbarossa to Berlin presents both the Allied and Axis players with a wide range of exciting game choices, while illustrating the key historical factors of the war: from the importance of mechanized forces in combat to the importance of oil to fuel them but without the complexity of other strategic WWII designs. And, unlike many of those games, World War 2: Barbarossa to Berlin lives up to its title: an Axis player who fails to win the war may still win the game. The winner is often decided on the last turn as the Allied player struggles to extinguish the last traces of the Nazi empire. Designed by Ted Raicer as a follow-up to his multi-award-winning World War One strategic game, Paths of Glory, World War 2: Barbarossa to Berlin modifies the Paths of Glory systems to capture the strategic and operational dynamics of WWII in Europe.

    As in Paths of Glory, the heart of the game lies in the 110 Action Cards (55 each for the Axis and Allied players). Each card can be used for operational movement and combat, strategic movement, replacements, or for an Event. The movement and combat systems will be familiar to Paths of Glory players, but have been modified to recreate the blitzkrieg campaigns of 1941-45.

    World War 2: Barbarossa to Berlin covers four years of epic struggle, from Moscow to Stalingrad, from Tobruk to Tunis, from Sicily to Rome, from D-Day to the Rhine, to the final battles for the Reich. It is June 22, 1941: will World War II end in German triumph in Operation Barbarossa or collapse in Berlin? As the world holds it breath, the decisions are all yours. 

    Game Features

     
    TIME SCALE 3 months (seasonal) per turn
    MAP SCALE Point-to-point system
    UNIT SCALE Fronts, Armies, and Corps
    NUMBER OF PLAYERS One or two