BLUE vs GRAY: THE CIVIL WAR CARD GAME

...and
75 more
in the
CSA
Deck!

CARD EXPLANATIONS
Each card is like a miniature encyclpedia...but without the door-to-door salesman. There are eight different types of cards used in Blue vs Gray, grouped into three basic varieties: LEADER CARDS, UNIT CARDS, and MISC. CARDS (shown below). We have tried to explain the differences between the types of cards, and included an example of each type. (While the cards shown may be of different sizes, every single card in the Blue vs Gray deck is 2 1/2 inches by 3 1/2 inches.) At the end of this treatise is a complete LIST OF CARDS. Enjoy!

...and
71 more
in the
USA
Deck!

TABLE OF CONTENTS
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
The explainations begin with a section dedicated to COMMAND STRUCTURES. Then a discussion of brains of operations, followed by the fighting men-at-arms, and finally the terrain & the unique political, social, and cultural events of the war.

LEADER CARDS
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

USA  ARMY-GROUP COMMANDER CSA  ARMY COMMANDER USA  ARMY COMMANDER USA  CORPS COMMANDER


UNIT CARDS
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

USA CORPS CSA DIVISION NAVAL SQUADRON CAVALRY


MISC. CARDS
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

MAP ENIGMA


Okay Private, scroll down the list...or pull rank and jump directly to a specific section to check out a card. 

NOTES ON LEADERS
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
“An army of rabbits led by a lion is far superior to an army of lions led by a rabbit.”
                ~ Napoleon.

You need leaders to concentrate the power of your forces and to attack.  If you don’t have leaders, your INFANTRY cards cannot combine their strength and your forces will be destroyed, piecemeal. Superior leadership (at least at the battlefield level) almost allowed the South to prevail over the larger federal armies.  But as the war continued, the North got better.

In accordance with the COMMAND STRUCTURE, any leader on the board must be leading a division (CSA), a corps (USA), or a SUBORDINATE who is in turn leading infantry unit(s) (or at least one CAVALRY unit).  If that leader loses all his units as a result of combat (or isn’t leading anything by the end of Step 2: Deploy/Move, of his turn), he goes to cadre (face-down).

Building a CSA Army is usually easier than putting together a USA Army-Group.  As a result, USA Armies (without subcommanders) will often be fighting CSA Armies (usually with subcommanders) until the USA can organize an Army-Group(s).  The USA has only two decent Army Group Commanders (Grant and Sherman) and not a lot of eligible subcommanders, so this might take quite some time.

COMMAND STRUCTURE
POSSIBLE COMMANDS
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
A Command can consist of the following combinations of cards:
  • A High-Level Leader with one or more subordinates leading unit(s).
  • Any Leader with unit(s), but without subordinates.
  • Two “paired up” cavalry cards.
  • Any single, lone Division, Corps, or Cavalry card.
.
EQUIVALENT FORCES
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
USA Army-Groups
are the equivalent of
CSA Armies

USA Armies
are the equivalent of
CSA Corps

USA Corps
are the equivalent of
CSA Divisions
SOUTHERN
COMMAND STRUCTURE
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
High-level: CSA Army commander card.
Low-level: CSA Corps commander card.
Base-level: CSA Division cards.
~ ~ ~
See rules card R18.
NORTHERN
COMMAND STRUCTURE
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
High-level: USA Army-Group comm. card.
Low-level: USA Army commander card.
Base-level: USA Corps cards.
~ ~ ~
See rules card R18.
USA ARMY GROUP COMMANDER
NORTHERN
HIGH-LEVEL COMMANDER
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Army-Group Commanders can have Army Commanders as SUBORDINATES.
Army-Group Commanders can lead Infantry Corps Cards. (Not including CAVALRY.)
Only the USA has Army-Group Commanders. The Southern equivalent would be a CSA Army Commander.
 
 


 

Back to the top of the page.

. In the example shown below (Sherman #62) note:
  • STRENGTH indicated in the bullets (2).
  • INITIATIVE indicated in the gold wreaths (2).
  • COMMAND CAPACITY indicated in the flags (2xxxx). (This is the number of Army Commanders, or the number of Corps, that can function in Sherman's command.) The COMMAND CAPACITY indicated on the bottom of the card in the flag (2xxx) is the number of Corps Sherman can command when he is functioning as a subordinate.)
  • Sherman's status of Political Favor, in the yellow box (only if Grant is in the game). (This is information which is particular to some cards.)
  • Sherman's nickname: "Uncle Billy" (Not all the commanders had nicknames we could verify.)
  • Biographical information.
  • Art credits under the photo.
  • Card number at bottom. (For historical play.)

An example of a USA Army Group Commander card (Sherman #62)
CSA ARMY COMMANDER
SOUTHERN
HIGH-LEVEL COMMANDER
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
CSA Army Commanders can have Corps Commanders as SUBORDINATES.
CSA Army Commanders can lead Infantry Division Cards. (Not including CAVALRY.)
 
 


 

Back to the top of the page.

. In the example shown below (Lee #38) note:
  • STRENGTH indicated in the bullets (4).
  • INITIATIVE indicated in the gold wreaths (2).
  • COMMAND CAPACITY indicated in the flags (3xxx). (This is the number of Corps Commanders, or the number of Divisions, that can function in Lee's command.)
  • The fact that Lee will not serve as a subordinate, and that he has Political Favor. (This is information which is particular to some cards.)
  • Lee's nickname: "Marse Robert". (Not all the commanders had nicknames we could verify.)
  • Biographical information.
  • Art credits under the photo.
  • Card number at bottom. (For historical play.)
R.E. Lee #38
An example of a CSA Army Commander card (Lee #38)
USA ARMY COMMANDER
NORTHERN
LOW-LEVEL COMMANDER
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Army Commanders cannot have SUBORDINATES, but lead Infantry Corps Cards. (Not including CAVALRY.)
 
 





 
 
 
 

Back to the top of the page.

. In the example shown below (Thomas #63) note:
  • STRENGTH indicated in the bullets (3).
  • INITIATIVE indicated in the gold wreaths (1-2). (The number on top indicates Initiative when on attack (1). The number on the bottom indicates Initiative when  in defense (2).)
  • COMMAND CAPACITY indicated in the flags (5xxx). (This is the number of Corps that can function in Thomas' command.) The COMMAND CAPACITY indicated on the bottom of the card in the flag (3xxx) is the number of Corps Sherman can command when he is functioning as a subordinate.)
  • Thomas' nickname: "Old Glory". (Not all the commanders had nicknames we could verify.)
  • Biographical information.
  • Art credits under the photo.
  • Card number at bottom. (For historical play.)
Thomas #63
An example of a USA Army Commander card (Thomas #63)
CSA CORPS COMMANDER
SOUTHERN
LOW-LEVEL COMMANDER
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Corps Commanders cannot have SUBORDINATES, but lead Infantry Division Cards. (Not including CAVALRY.)
 
 


 
 

Back to the top of the page.

.  In the example shown below (Jackson #21) note:
  • STRENGTH indicated in the bullets (3).
  • INITIATIVE indicated in the gold wreaths (2).
  • COMMAND CAPACITY indicated in the flags (5). (This is the number of Divisions that can function in jackson's command.)
  • The fact that Jackson can rejoin a command to defend. (This is information which is particular to some cards.)
  • Jackson's nickname: "Stonewall". (Not all the commanders had nicknames we could verify.)
  • Biographical information.
  • Art credits under the photo.
  • Card number at bottom. (For historical play.)
Jackson #21
 An example of a CSA Corps Commander card (Jackson #21)
USA CORPS
NORTHERN INFANTRY
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
The INFANTRY of the North. The CORPS cards include a list of famous COMMANDERSand some of the important battles the unit fought in. In the lower left hand corner of the card, the term EAST or WEST highlights the theater from which the unit was raised, or where it entered the war. The card also includes an image of the Corps' Insignia, and a representation of their overall strength (the number in the bullet in the upper left/lower right corners).
In the example shown to the right (XVI Corps #49) note:
  • STRENGTH indicated in the bullets (2).
  • The Corps Insignia the unit was raised under. 
  • That the XVI Corps has a depleted strength value of 1. (This is information which is particular to some cards.)
  • Biographical information for the Corps' commanders.
  • Card number at bottom. (For historical play.)
  • The WEST next to  the card number.
.
XVI Corps #49
An example of a USA Corps card
(XVI Corps #49)
 


 

Back to the top of the page.

CSA DIVISIONS
SOUTHERN INFANTRY
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
The INFANTRY of the South. The Division cards contain the same information as the Corps cards, except rather that have an insignia, the Division's Battle Flag is shown.
In the example shown to the right (Hood's Division #35) note:
  • STRENGTH indicated in the bullets (3).
  • The Battle Flag the unit was raised under. 
  • The special note about playing the card before the CSA Late-War. (This is information which is particular to some cards.)
  • Biographical information for the Division's commanders.
  • Card number at bottom. (For historical play.)
  • The EAST-WEST next to  the card number. (Allows deployment into either theater when playing with the Optional Rules.)
.
Hood's Division #35
 An example of a CSA Division card
(Hood's Division #35)

Back to the top of the page.

NAVAL SQUADRONS
NORTHERN NAVAL UNITS
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
There is one card for each of the three NAVAL SQUADRONS Atlantic, Gulf, and Riverine. Differentiated by the anchors in the upper left and lower right corners, each Naval card includes all aspects of that unit's Naval Arsenal: sailors, captains, boats, the works. The most famous commander is shown, as well as a list of others who lead the unit during the war.
In the example shown to the right (Porter #5 AT START) note:
  • STRENGTH indicated in the bullets (3).
  • The anchors in the upper left and  lower right corners.
  • The North Atlantic Blockading Squadron designation (its historical role).
  • Biographical information for the Squadron's commanders.
  • Art credits under the photo.
  • Card number at bottom. (For historical play.)
  • The AT START next to the card number. (This is one of the five Northern AT START cards.)
.
Porter #5
An example of a Naval Squadron card
(Porter #5 AT START)
 


 

Back to the top of the page.

CAVALRY
NORTHERN & SOUTHERN CAVALRY
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Crossed sabers in the upper left/lower right corners designate the CAVALRY units from both sides. A list of important commanders and critical battles in which the unit played a role accompanies each card.
Unlike infantry, Lone or “PAIRED” Cavalry can attack on its own without leader cards.
Cavalry played an important but somewhat less vital role than in the past. Improved rifles reduced its effectiveness. But cavalry was still necessary for reconnaissance, pursuit (when it occurred), raiding, etc. Only Forrest got the brilliant idea to throw away all those heavy sabers and arm his men with shotguns (to the horror of the cavalry purists), speed to his chosen battleground, then dismount and fight like infantry.
. In the example shown below (Forrest #44) note:
  • STRENGTH indicated in the bullets (5).
  • INITIATIVE indicated in the gold wreaths (2).
  • The fact that Forrest will only serve in the Western Theater. (This is information which is particular to some cards.)
  • Forrest's nickname: "That Devil". (Not all the commanders had nicknames we could verify.)
  • Biographical information.
  • Art credits under the photo.
  • Card number at bottom. (For historical play.)



 

Back to the top of the page.

Forrest #44
An example of a Cavalry card (Forrest #44)
CAVALRY IN THE CHAIN OF COMMAND:
The possible chains of command
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Bold lettering designates cavalry cards. Italics designate infantry cards.
Examples of those chains
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Blue lettering designates specific Northern cards used in the examples below, and Brown designates specific Southern cards. Bold designates the cavalry cards. Italics designate infantry cards.
High-Level Commander
    Cavalry (riding for free)
    Subcommander A
       Infantry unit
       Infantry unit
    Subcommander B
       Infantry unit
Sherman commanding
    Sheridan (riding for free)
    Howard subcommanding
      XX Corps
      XV Corps
    Hooker subcommanding
       IX Corps
High-Level Commander
    Cavalry (riding for free)
    Cavalry (in lieu of a subcommander)
    Subcommander A
       Infantry unit
       Infantry unit
    Subcommander B
       Infantry unit
Robert E. Lee commanding
    Stuart (riding for free)
    Forrest(in lieu of a subcommander)
    Longstreet subcommanding
      A.P. Hill's Div.
      Cheatham's Div.
    Hood subcommanding
      The Stonewall Div.
(In the example directly above, neither Subcommander A nor Subcommander B can lead cavalry.  That would count as subcommanders.)
High-Level or Low-Level Commander
    Cavalry (riding for free)
    Infantry unit
    Infantry unit
    Infantry unit
 Grant or Banks commanding
    Grierson (riding for free)
    XII Corps
    XIX Corps
    VI Corps
Low-Level Commander
    Cavalry (riding for free)
 Pemberton commanding
    Van Dorn (riding for free)
(In the example directly above, the Low-Level Commander could lead additional infantry up to his individual limit, but could not lead any more cavalry.  That would count as subcommanders.)
High-Level Commander
    Cavalry (riding for free)
    Cavalry (in lieu of a subcommander)
    Cavalry (in lieu of a subcommander)
    Infantry unit
 Halleck commanding
    Wilson (riding for free)
    Sheridan(in lieu of a subcommander)
    Grierson (in lieu of a subcommander)
    XI Corps
Cavalry Commander
Cavalry (paired up under commander)
Forrestcommanding
Stuart(paired up under commander)


Back to the top of the page.

MAP CARDS
INNOVATIONS
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Map cards are one of the innovative features of EnigmaTM Series Games.  They allow for a different map each game.

They are historically suitable for the Civil War.  The clash of armies began in Virginia, but was still spreading many months later.  Serious army-level action in the Western Theater did not begin until the end of 1861.  In several cases, cities that are Pro-South on a Southern Map Card can be Pro-North on the corresponding Northern Map Card (e.g., Map Cards C, H, J).

.
STRATEGY TIP
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
As the USA, always refuse to replace a useless map card if you can afford to (just discard it).  For every two useless map card you don’t replace, you can squeeze out an extra turn.  Not only is an extra turn valuable in and of itself, but it nets you up to three extra supply points as well!
 
 

Back to the top of the page.

In Blue vs GrayTM, the spread of the war itself is also somewhat variable.  This adds a realistic uncertainty as to what and where conflict may break loose next.  Every game has a different map situation.  Your strategic decisions are often influenced by what the map has to offer.

If the other player gets most of the map cards, don’t despair because you will have bigger armies as a direct result (when/if you replace your useless map cards).

In the example shown below (Map cards A, B, C, and D) note:
  • The Appalachians (colored tan) dividing the two theaters: East and West.
  • The Map Key on Map card E. 
  • Card numbers by each letter. (For historical play.)
Blue vs Gray - Example Photo

An example of Map cards (Map cards A, B, D, and E, the four AT START Map cards)

ENIGMATM CARDS
THAT EXTRA SOMETHING SPECIAL
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
These are “Event Cards” that deal with a multitude of  other things. These include many social or political situations such as Draft Riots, Emancipation, local unrest, spies, partisans, melodrama, etc. 

They add a flavor and feel to the game and help tell the story of how and why the war was fought.  Oftentimes, military decisions will be based on such factors, and the fact that such factors often occur unexpectedly.


Back to the top of the page.

. In the example shown below ("Old Abe" #48) note:
  • The Enigma symbol in the upper left and lower right corners. (This appears on every Enigma card.)
  • The fact that "Old Abe" is playable only in the Western Theater. 
  • That it adds +1 to combat results if attacking, -1 if defending. 
  • That it is played as a reserve. 
  • Contextual information about the event.
  • Art credits under the photo.
  • Card number at bottom. (For historical play.)

An example of an Enigma card ("Old Abe" #48)
COMPLETE LIST
CARDS IN THE USA DECK (NORTH)
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
CARDS IN THE CSA DECK (SOUTH)
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
#1. Map Card A (AT START)
#2. Map Card B (AT START)
#3. The Devil’s Own Luck (AT START)
#4. Dept. of Washington (AT START)
#5. David Dixon Porter (AT START)
#6. Habeas Corpus
#7. Andrew Hull Foote
#8. Irvin McDowell
#9. I Corps
#10. XII Corps
#11. George B. McClellan
#12. Map Card C (Neutral Kentucky)
#13. Nathaniel P. Banks
#14. Henry W. Halleck
#15. XI Corps
#16. VIII Corps
#17. Don C. Buell
#18. XIV Corps
#19. Ulysses S. Grant
#20. XIII Corps
#21. XV Corps
#22. Map Card H
#23. Monitor
#24. II Corps
#25. III Corps
#26. Map Card F
#27. IV Corps
#28. V Corps
#29. Map Card I
#30. VI Corps
#31. Map Card J
#32. Benjamin F. Butler
#33. XIX Corps
#34. John Pope
#35. David G. Farrugut
#36. IX Corps
#37. XX Corps
#38. John Brown’s Body
#39. XXI Corps
#40. X Corps
#41. Special Orders #191
#42. XVIII Corps
#43. William S. Rosecrans
#44. VII Corps
#45. Map Card G
#46. Ambrose E. Burnside
#47. James H. Wilson
#48. "Old Abe" The Battle Eagle
#49. XVI Corps
#50. XVII Corps
#51. Emancipation Proclamation
#52. Joseph Hooker
#53. George Stoneman
#54. Benjamin H. Grierson
#55. XXII Corps
#56. George G. Meade
#57. Pauline Cushman
#58. Reserve Corps
#59. XXIII Corps
#60. The Blue Mountain Boys
#61. Swamp Angel
#62. William T. Sherman
#63. George H. Thomas
#64. Map Card C (Pro-North Kentucky)
#65. The Freedom Sickness
#66. Map Card K
#67. James B. McPherson
#68. Infernal Machines
#69. Philip H. Sheridan
#70. Oliver O. Howard
#71. Edward O.C. Ord
#72. 1864 Elections*
#73. Henry W. Slocum
#74. XXIV Corps
#75. XXV Corps
#76. Provisional Corps
#1. Map Card D (AT START)
#2. Map Card E (AT START)
#3. Miracle From God (AT START)
#4. Tidewater Militia (AT START)
#5. "La Belle Rebelle"
#6. Pierre G.T. Beauregard
#7. Pickett’s Division
#8. Joseph E. Johnston
#9. Stonewall Division
#10. Ewell’s Division
#11. Lovell’s Division
#12. Pillow’s Division
#13. Cheatam’s Division
#14. Albert S. Johnston
#15. Cleburne’s Division
#16. Buckner’s Division
#17. Leonidas Polk
#18. Simon B. Buckner
#19. Ironclads
#20. The Slows
#21. Thomas J. Jackson
#22. D.H. Hill’s Division
#23. William J. Hardee
#24. Hindman’s Division
#25. Map Card H
#26. Braxton Bragg 
#27. Map Card F
#28. A.P. Stewart’s Division
#29. Breckinridge’s Division
#30. McLaws’
#31. Map Card C
#32. John B. Magruder
#33. R.H. Anderson’s Division
#34. A.P. Hill’s Division
#35. Hood’s Division
#36. Map Card G
#37. Map Card I
#38. Robert E. Lee
#39. (Edmund) Kirby Simth
#40. Copperheads
#41. James Longstreet
#42. Stenenson’s Division
#43. Sterling Price
#44. Nathan B. Forrest
#45. James E.B. Stuart
#46. Henry Heth’s Division
#47. Ranson’s Division
#48. Earl Van Dorn
#49. Maury’s Division
#50. John C. Pemberton
#51. Joseph Wheeler
#52. M.L. Smith’s Division
#53. Loring’s Division
#54. Forney’s Division
#55. Bowen’s Division
#56. Richard S. Ewell
#57. Map Card J
#58. Ambrose P. Hill
#59. French’s Division
#60. W.H.T. Walker’s Division
#61. Draft Riots
#62. Rebel Yell
#63. Danial H. Hill
#64. Dabney H. Maury
#65. Preston’s Division
#66. Partisan Rangers
#67. Digging for the South
#68. Map Card K
#69. John B. Hood
#70. John C. Breckinridge
#71. "Degataga"
#72. Jubal A. Early
#73. Walthall’s Division
#74. Hoke’s Division
#75. Richard H. Anderson
#76. Stephen D. Lee
#77. Alexander P. Stewart
#78. Gordon’s Division
#79. Benjamin F. Cheatam
#80. John B. Gordon
THUS END'TH THE DISCUSSION

Back to the top of the page.
Back to the Blue vs GrayTM HQ.


Copyright 1999 Q.E.D. Games, Inc. All rights reserved.  BLUE VS GRAY: THE CIVIL WAR CARD GAME and the term ENIGMA are TM Evan Jones.